Your Best Body Ever #2 Part 2 – Strength

Your Best Body Ever #2 Part 2 – Strength

8 rules to get bullshit strong

  1. Be consistent
  2. Train hard but still be smart about it
  3. Hit all body parts
  4. You must continually get stronger
  5. Warming up is mandatory
  6. Use good technique, most of the time
  7. Eat like its your job
  8. Sleep well and avoid stress

1. Be consistent

Consistency is the name of the game, and the person who trains week in and week out will experience good gains in strength and muscularity over time. You can’t train once a month and see progress. You can’t train sporadically throughout the year. While short-term intensive training can be effective, the person who trains twice per week for 52 weeks out of the year will see better long-term results than the lifter who trains five times per week for 20 weeks out of the year.

2. Train hard but still be smart about it

You must work hard, but you don’t have to kill yourself every session. You have to listen to what your body is telling you and make adjustments. This is incredibly important. Experiment to figure out what works best for you. Training hard is good. Training smart is good. Combine the two and you’ve got the best of both worlds.

3. Hit all body parts

If a muscle never gets activated, it won’t grow. To make a muscle grow, it must be stimulated on a regular basis. Make sure that you incorporate exercises into your programs that combine to hit the entire body’s musculature and if you want maximum muscle mass in a particular area, then make sure you get strong at the exercise that elicits the highest activation in that muscle or muscle part.
For example, hip thrusts elicit the highest glute activation, so even if you’re squatting and deadlifting it’s worth adding them into the mix if maximum glute size is the goal. Similarly, if rear delt hypertrophy is the goal, military presses won’t cut it – add in some targeted rear delt work.

4. You must continually get stronger

Progressive overload is the most important aspect in the strength game. If you embark on a strength-training regimen and fail to get stronger, you won’t gain much muscle. You must use heavier loads and perform more reps over time.
There are many ways to progress, and progressive overload isn’t mandatory, but in the first few years of strength training, it forms a huge component of your success. Bodybuilders may not train heavy in terms of percentage of 1RM, since they typically perform medium to high reps. But initially any competitive bodybuilder will spend time focusing on their strength in the big basic lifts – This is why larger bodybuilders can typically rep out with ridiculous amounts of weight. Strength forms the foundation for improvements in other areas such as power production. Ideally, you want to progress dramatically in strength in a squat, a deadlift, an upper body press and an upper body pull. You have to perform the lifts regularly to maximize motor learning.

5. Warming up is mandatory

You can’t just walk into the weight room and bench, squat, or deadlift a 1RM. If you do this you’re running the gauntlet every time you train. Some people need 30 minutes of warming up to feel right, while others may only need 10 minutes. But everyone must make sure they have appropriate range of motion and have the blood flowing before lifting heavy loads. If you’re unsure about warm up routines for lifting look up the Ludus Sports Performance pre training warm ups. Remember that failing to take the warm-up seriously will eventually result in disaster. Beginners typically ignore the warm-up and learn the hard way to take this component of the training session more seriously.

6. Use good technique most of the time

Walk into any weight room and you’ll typically see people at one end of the technique spectrum or the other. Some lifters are very strict, perhaps even too strict, as they never use appreciable loads due to their robotic technique; others should reduce the weight dramatically and stop relying on momentum and energy leaks.
You certainly have some wiggle room in terms of form, as its been shown that slight momentum can increase torque
requirements and muscle activation. Your form will also break down a bit if you test your max so don’t be so tight up about it. However, most of the time you need to be very strict with your exercise form, and you need to learn the right type of form for your body on the various lifts. This is especially important for squats and deadlifts. Failure to do so will result in, surprise, surprise, pain and injury, which will stop progress in its tracks.

7. Eat like it’s your job

The best training program in the world is no match for a crappy diet. If you want to build a good physique and perform optimally, then you must take nutrition seriously.
You need to eat the right types of food for your goals and physiology. But you don’t have to be perfect. However, eating a bunch of crap day in and day out won’t allow you to reach your potential, and will prevent you from your gains in terms of strength and hypertrophy. If you need more information of nutrition for hypertrophy and strength gain, use the Ludi Mammalis how to. Also use supplementation, protein powder, amino acids and essential fatty acids are all very helpful.

8. Sleep well and reduce stress

Similar to nutrition, if you aren’t sleeping well or are stressed out around the clock, your physiology will be working against you. If you’re training hard you should prioritize sleep. Make a genuine effort to be consistent with your sleep if you’re serious about getting results.
Failure to do so will hinder your pursuit of strength and hypertrophy. Regarding stress, your goal should not be to eliminate it altogether, but rather to manage it. It’s good to be challenged in life, but there’s a fine line between eustress (positive or curative stress; like a good workout) and distress (negative stress). You can step back and analyze your life choices and habits. This is an area in which many people can make adjustments that lead to immediate results.
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